Meeting to discuss declining enrollment in Cupertino Union schools

Cupertino High School opens new classrooms and science buildings

In the 2015-16 school year, Cupertino Union School District had 18,910 students. This year that number is 2,200 students less – 16,712 – and is projected to drop another 2,500 to 14,262 by 2024-25, according to district estimates.

Cupertino Union, which has Kindergarten through Grade 8 elementary and middle schools in Cupertino and parts of San Jose, Sunnyvale, Saratoga, Santa Clara, and Los Altos, is not alone in facing a deepening enrollment crisis. Numerous West Valley districts are in the same boat, as rising housing costs are causing families – or young people thinking about starting a family – to head toward more affordable areas.

This enrollment decline has led to budgetary challenges and questions on whether the district needs to maintain its current slate of five middle schools and all of their feeder elementary schools.

On Thursday, November 21, school district officials will continue their outreach and listening sessions as they attempt to garner community feedback about future plans. The district’s event notice states, “It is the District’s hope that by holding community-located Board meetings, the Trustees will hear data about each feeder pattern, consider public comment and ultimately, be better prepared to set criteria for making decisions going forward.”

This week’s meeting, set for Miller Middle School, 6151 Rainbow Dr., in San Jose, begins at 6 p.m. It follow last week’s meeting at Lawson Middle School.

Future special meetings are listed below.

  • December 12, 2019 – Kennedy Middle School – 6 p.m.
  • December 19, 2019 – Hyde Middle School – 6 p.m.
  • January 9, 2020 – Cupertino Middle School – 6 p.m.

To see the agenda for Thursday’s meeting at Miller Middle School, click here.

1 Comment on "Meeting to discuss declining enrollment in Cupertino Union schools"

  1. Susan Price-Jang | November 20, 2019 at 7:43 am | Reply

    this is being felt all over San Jose. The housing crisis is threatening public education. Families are moving away and so are teachers.

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